Alone With Silicon

In this past Sunday Review section of the New York Times, Louise Aronson, an associate professor of geriatrics at UCSF, writes about robot caregiving in The Futures of Robot Caregivers.  This short article is well worth a read because it’s a geriatrician’s eye view of the role of robots in home care. Aronson points out that many are exceedingly alone at home, and that the solution to this problem is robot caregiving, for safety (emergency response), chores (fold your laundry, clean the bathroom) and for emotional companionship (conversation).  The article is one compelling view, but there are alternatives worthy of discussion. It is easy, after all, to make a value hierarchy argument, as Aronson does:

But most of us do not live in an ideal world, and a reliable robot may be better than an unreliable or abusive person, or than no one at all.

Indeed, abusive people are terrible. But the interesting question is, what is the right role for robotics in the home. Should robotic technologies melt into the walls, providing a smart home that is safe and responsive, or should robots have a tangible form in the home, depending on social expectations to engage in artificial conversations with the lonely. And just how artificially emotional do we allow these conversations to become?

Sherry Turkle is indeed good reading on this subject, as Aronson points out. But in quoting Turkle regarding Paro, Aronson did not quite point out Turkle’s key thesis: that these relationships between robots and humans are wholly artificial, that they make use of forms of deception that convince the human of a depth that simply isn’t there, and that, in Turkle’s opinion, this is seriously questionable from an ethical point of view.

My own point of view comes down further on the smart home side than the android side. As for companionship, while I realize that there aren’t enough caregivers, I would remind the reader that the U.S. is not Japan. We have massive, chronic underemployment. We ought to spend real thinking energy figuring a way to turn caregiving into a sufficiently viable service economy to help with our idled human populace before we replace the potential for their work with robotic androids.

 

One thought on “Alone With Silicon

  1. zathra

    This is an interesting topic, as I am approaching late middle age & am disabled. A robot companion would be ideal for many people in my situation. A robot / synthetic being would be available in the same manner that human care – giver’s services would ( or perhaps by rental on a monthly basis ). Preferably it would look human / humanoid & thus inspiring a level of trust. It would assemble a databank of my personal preferences, character traits, medical needs, & what have you. It could approximate a male or female personality, being either a brotherly character, or perhaps a helpful motherly / sisterly female friend, but still professional in demeanor.

    This could become even more real as the industrialized world enters the early mid – 21st century.

    Reply

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